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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.U.S. e-cigarette cases of mysterious lung disease surge by 52% a week, causing 12 deathsThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.U.S. e-cigarette cases of mysterious lung disease surge by 52% a week, causing 12 deathsU.S. e-cigarette cases of mysterious lung disease surge by 52% a week, causing 12 deathsThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.U.S. e-cigarette cases of mysterious lung disease surge by 52% a week, causing 12 deaths

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.U.S. e-cigarette cases of mysterious lung disease surge by 52% a week, causing 12 deathsThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.U.S. e-cigarette cases of mysterious lung disease surge by 52% a week, causing 12 deaths

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U.S. e-cigarette cases of mysterious lung disease surge by 52% a week, causing 12 deathsThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.U.S. e-cigarette cases of mysterious lung disease surge by 52% a week, causing 12 deathsU.S. e-cigarette cases of mysterious lung disease surge by 52% a week, causing 12 deaths

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.U.S. e-cigarette cases of mysterious lung disease surge by 52% a week, causing 12 deathsU.S. e-cigarette cases of mysterious lung disease surge by 52% a week, causing 12 deathsThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Thursday that a mysterious lung disease that began last week is rapidly deteriorating. The number of confirmed or suspected cases reached 805, a 52% increase from a week ago. CDC data as of Tuesday showed that at least 12 people have been killed in 10 U.S. states. US federal health officials still don鈥檛 know what causes people to get sick. CDC said: “Most patients have reported that they have used e-cigarette products containing THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Many patients report using THC and nicotine. Some people report that only e-cigarette products containing nicotine have been used. "As of September 17, the CDC has confirmed 530 suspected cases and 7 deaths. The increase compared to last week includes new cases and the confirmation of previous cases. Patients are distributed in 46 states in the United States. Health officials said the disease mainly affects men, and all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette use. According to the CDC, two-thirds of patients are between 18 and 24 years old, and 16% are under 18 years old. CDC has dispatched more than 100 doctors and investigators to determine the cause of this deadly disease. This disease is similar to rare pneumonia. Early symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The US legislature is taking this opportunity to review the e-cigarette industry. A panel in the US House of Representatives is investigating Juul, the leader in the e-cigarette market. They asked senior CDC officials to answer on Tuesday what caused people to get sick. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar (Alex Azar) said that US President Trump is preparing to ban flavored e-cigarettes. This e-cigarette has received close attention because of its attractiveness to children. Some state and local governments in the United States have begun to ban such sales. Michigan was the first state to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, and San Francisco was the first city to announce the ban. In addition, public health officials also urge users not to use various e-cigarette products. CDC recommends not to use e-cigarettes on the street, and do not add substances that are not used by manufacturers in e-cigarettes.